A beginner gets lost in EVE online

Space Jaunting: Part 1 – Day 1.5 – Unstable Worm(holes)

Welcome back.  Look, we have pictures!  At last.  All the shots in this post and beyond were all taken by my fare hand, so no they’re not publicity shots, and yes the game does look that good.  From one moment to the next there’s star-spangled vistas, screen filling planets and always lots of shiny, shiny spaceships.

Talking of which I now have 6!  This is getting ridiculous.  My favourite so far is this beauty, the Imicus (not my choice of name, if it was my choice I’d call it the Inquisitive Badger):

It’s designed as an exploration vehicle and looks like a silhouette of someone stretching their calf muscles after a run.  All excellent stuff.

In the last post Maxi Foyle had just started his Exploration training and was finding it a bit of a chore.  He’s completed it all now and whilst it’s definately a bit of a pain doing the exploring, he’s grown to love the benefits of it.

Basically ‘exploring’ works by releasing a few probes (no giggling at the back, please!)  into a system and then entering a 3D map to position your probes about the place and scan for…some stuff.  If one of your probes finds something within it’s scan radius you move your other probes closer to it and narrow your search field and scan again, hopefully pinpointing the exact location of whatever goody you’ve found.  And what goodies there are!  Scanning will locate hidden asteroid fields of mineable material, ancient alien artefacts for study, clouds of gas that can be hoovered up and sold as narcotics, and most excitingly of all…wormholes! (It’s the wierd wibbly thing at the top of this pic):

Having completed his exploration training Maxi set off to have a bit of an explore and found this beauty hidden on the edge of a Gallente system.  Clicking ‘Enter Wormhole’ produced a warning box about the inherent dangers of entering unstable wormholes and how they can transport you to unexplored regions of space far from CONCORD’s (the in-game police force’s) protection and shut before you can come back.  Maxi Foyle cares not for warning messages though, and ventured into the unkown…

Maxi Foyle, Wormhole Prober, and The Inquisitive Badger exited the otherside unscathed, only to find themselves in an ‘Unknown’ system, of ‘Unknown’ ownership, with a security rating of -1.0!  Much as I’d like to say we then boldy explored the new found region I was far too scared of what may lie within.  Even though nothing hostile was showing on the radar, we turned around, stopping only to take the above photo, and returned to normal space post-haste.

That’s probably the most adventurous adventure our adventurer has been on today, but he did have a bit of a run in with the local customs officers when he tried to smuggle class A drugs through a Jumpgate (I stole them off that not very dreaded pirate Wolf during the combat training, honest!) and was locked in a stasis field with high powered weapons locked on our hull until we agreed to hand over the contraband.  Luckily, as with most of the rewards in this game, the punishment was purely monetary and with a fine paid and the contraband confiscated (Did anyone get invited to a Custom’s Officer party tonight?) we were free to continue our escapades.  I’m assuming drug smuggling is possible, but clearly I’ll need to do some more research and be more careful if I plan on taking it up as a profession.

That’s it for today.  Probably half way through the training missions now, currently learning how to mine:

Once I’ve got a handle on the available money making careers (there seems to be a lot of money in mining…) I’ll have to think about what profession Maxi Foyle, Space Jobhunter, wants to pursue.  More on that next time.

Advertisements

One response

  1. Pingback: Space Jaunting 2.2 – Money making, money money making « Space Jaunting

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s